Letter of Recommendation

5 Simple Steps To Ask For A Letter Of Recommendation

Perhaps you’ve completed a summer internship and are easing back into the school year. You’re suddenly struck with the realization that you haven’t yet asked for a letter of recommendation from the organization you interned with.  A letter is key—you’ll need it for college or job applications. It’s crucial “proof” of your experience reinforcing your resume.

It’s not too late to solicit that letter of recommendation. Follow these five easy steps to gracefully and effectively land a well-crafted one.

How to Get a Letter of Recommendation:

(1) Acknowledge how busy your supervisor is. The last image you want to project is one of self-absorbed entitlement; this person is taking time out of his or her busy day to do you an important favor, so acknowledge that generosity. At the same time, somebody taking on interns is obligated to provide letters of recommendation, so don’t be bashful about your request.

In short, be assertive—but not presumptuous.

(2) Offer options. Make it easy for the person to get the letter into your hands. If you’re still interning, ask for it well in advance so you can carry it home on your last day—about as easy for all involved as can be. Include your mailing address in your request no matter what to be safe.

(3) Ensure the letter of recommendation looks legitimate: Request that your supervisor print it on company letterhead. Also, ask that the letter be addressed “To Whom It May Concern:” so that it’s applicable in whatever situation you need it—applying for schools, jobs, or internships.

(4) Make sure academic interests are emphasized. You don’t want to suggest you were simply running around making copies as an intern, but instead forging practical workplace and problem-solving skills. Ask your supervisor to highlight the relevance of your internship duties to academic interests.

(5) Ask for a story. Encourage your supervisor to incorporate anecdotes that demonstrate your personality and abilities. This is partly to make the letter enjoyable to read; it’s also about humanizing yourself. Your letter should demonstrate you’re a real person with unique attributes—someone really worth hiring or accepting into a program.

Follow these straightforward tips, and you can feel more confident that a genuine, encouraging letter of recommendation is in the hands of people you’re trying to impress.

Photo credit: losmininos

6 Tips When Asking for a Letter of Recommendation

SAMPLE LETTERS OF RECOMMENDATION FROM OUR WORKPLACE MENTORS

Colleges are interested in students who seek out experiences related to their academic interests and talents. Most colleges accept up to three letters of recommendation- from a teacher, guidance counselor and one additional letter from another adult such as a coach. Including a letter from a workplace mentor shows that the student has sought out this type of experience and has excelled.

In our school-to-career program, we help students as they ask their mentors for these letters. Whether on a job or internship, asking for a letter of recommendation is one of the most stressful, but important tasks. Students in our program tell us that they use their letters for many years to come, as they apply for jobs and internships in college.

Asking for a Letter of Recommendation….Here are a few helpful tips:

1. Ask your immediate supervisor, the person who you are working directly under.

2. Don’t wait until the end of your internship. Two weeks before your end date would give your mentor enough time.

3. Ask if you could possibly get the letter on your last day but have a stamped, self-addressed envelope ready to give them in case they need more time.

4. Hand them a written request. This will make it much easier for your mentor.

Your written request should look something like this

I have learned so much working here. If possible, I would appreciate a letter of recommendation on your company letterhead for my files. I will be using this letter for college and work applications.

My email is:
My mailing address is:

I would appreciate a hard, signed copy as well as a digital signed copy.

It should be addressed as: To Whom It may Concern

Since colleges are particularly interested in my academic interests, I have described them below. If possible, I wondered if you might mention them and how they related to the internship.

 My academic interests are:

I have also bulleted a list of tasks and activities that I participated in on this job:

Thank you for taking the time to mentor me on my internship.

-Your name

5. Don’t pester your mentor if you haven’t received the letter. Wait 1 month and only ask them one more time.

6. After you receive your letter of recommendation, send a hand-written thank you note.

 

 

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